Tag Archives: plug-in electric hybrid

Miami Lakes Electric Vehicle Recharging

The ABCs of Electric Vehicle Recharging

Miami Lakes Electric Vehicle Recharging

Jeez the auto market is being taken over by hybrids isn’t it? To think the first hybrids started to make headway into the industry about a decade ago, and to see how many are on the road today is pretty impressive. Today, auto names like Kia Motors are quickly adding hybrids, plug-in electric hybrids (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs) to their lineup, and one day, you may find yourself in one and in need of a charge.

Different Types of Charging

Due to innovative systems that recycle various types of energy, like regenerative braking, PHEVs and EVs both recharge their vehicle’s battery (or batteries) while on the road. However, this happens little-by-litte, whereas recharging can get a battery to 80% full in a couple of hours. While PHEVs can be powered by gas, electricity, or both, EVs are only powered by electricity. Thus, EV drivers can only refuel at a charging station, and that makes it’s important for a driver to know all about charging their vehicle, what’s the fastest method of recharging, what’s the most cost effective method of recharging, and what is the most practical?

Home Charging

The most practical and convenient way to recharge a PHEV or EV is by plugging into the wall or installing a 240-volt home charger. The latter is becoming pretty popular, and we discuss more on that below. Sure, there may be a little bump in the monthly electric bill, but it isn’t all that bad. According to FuelEconomy.gov and the current national average of electricity, the average cost of electricity for the Kia Soul EV to travel 25 miles is about $1.04 The national average for electricity, or about $4.16 to travel 100 miles? That’s not much.

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Miami Lakes Kia Alternative Fuel

Pros and Cons of Gas, Hybrids, PHEVs, and EVs

Miami Lakes Kia Alternative Fuel

The fuels we use to power automobiles today are starting to vary greatly. For the better part of the last century, all we had was gasoline and diesel. Although alternatively powered vehicles were being invented as early as 1828, the first mass-produced hybrid vehicle didn’t come about until 1997. Today, the auto industry has pushed past that, and we’re seeing more plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) than ever before. Some companies are even researching and developing hydrogen fuel cells as a new source, but the practicality and popularity of that is a little ways down the road. Today, it all comes down to cars powered by gasoline, a hybrid, a PHEV, or an EV for getting where you need to go. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, though, and they’re worth taking into consideration the next time you’re in the market for an automobile.

Gasoline Vehicles

It was the first fuel source for vehicles we had, but it won’t be the last. We all know how they work. We fill up, we drive, we fill up again. So let’s get right down to it.

A lot of the advantages of gasoline powered vehicles are pretty out-dated with the new fuel sources we have now. They used to travel further than most vehicles, unless we’re talking about diesel-power, and the smaller the car the further it will go before it needs to be filled up. However, because gasoline vehicles are practical and conventional, when running on fumes, there’s bound to be a gas station around the corner unless we’re on the interstate, and even then, a place to fill up could be right off the next exit. Plus, when it comes to hauling a payload or towing, gasoline and diesel engines are really the best choice to make ‘cause they’ll definitely get the job done.

We know the disadvantages like the back of our hand. Gasoline vehicles are killing the environment – the Kia Sportage uses 14.3 barrels of petroleum every year! It also emits 397 grams per mile of greenhouse gas emissions. Gasoline prices are never the same, and the more oil we use, the higher the prices will be. Those of you driving around the Bush era know what we’re talking about – $4/gallon, what is this?! And there’s definitely no special perks like the federal tax credits you’ll find below. The main perk is they’re becoming cheaper to build with aluminum and other lighter resources going into auto body construction, so most gasoline-powered vehicles will save you more upfront than an alternative fuel-powered vehicle.

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