Posts Tagged ‘kia soul kia soul EV’

Kia Motors Gets Kudos for Going EV

Wednesday, August 8th, 2018
Miami Lakes Automall Kia Niro

Miami Lakes Automall Kia Niro

Once again, for 2018, Kia Motors is the leading non-luxury brand in the automarket according to the 2018 J.D. Power Initial Quality Study. 2018 marks the third year-in-a-row that Kia Motors nabs that spot. This put Kia Motors in the spotlight once again, and has many news organizations examining the lineup for what makes the auto brand so great. Recently, WardsAuto and U.S. News & World Report tackled Kia Motors venture into alternative fuel and their new electric vehicles.

To put it simply, WardsAuto paid Kia Motors kudos for not only receiving the second-highest score during the J.D. Initial Quality Study ever, but with an advanced powertrain field, the automaker has been aggressively moving onto greener pastures with hybrids, plug-in hybrids, and electric vehicles. One of the snags many automakers hit with alternative fuel is driving range, but Kia Motors tackles that too.

“It is a huge step for many buyers to go all the way from a gas car to 100% electric…It involves how much confidence they feel. As range increases, anxiety will be reduced. So we think the hybrid and specifically the plug-in hybrid is a nice evolution to get people on the way to full electric.” – Orth Hedrick, vice president-product planning at Kia Motors America.

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Kia’s Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017
Miami Lakes Kia Hybrid Electric Niro Crossover

Miami Lakes Kia Hybrid Electric Niro Crossover

Kia has been coming out with a lot of new vehicles lately. This year we were treated to the debut of the Kia Stinger, and at SEMA, we got a glimpse of some autonomous vehicles Kia is developing. However, until autonomous vehicles become the norm, automakers need to focus on where the money is, and right now that’s crossovers, SUVs, and hybrids. No wonder Kia has four of their own, including the 2017 Kia Niro Hybrid Crossover.

SO, where did it all start? We’re thinking the Kia Optima Hybrid set the stage, a variation of the original Optima, followed by the Optima PHEV and Kia Soul EV – another variation of an original model. The 2017 Kia Niro is the most recent of the trend.

Kia Optima Hybrids

The 2017 Kia Optima Hybrid and PHEV are both variations of the original Kia Optima. They may look the same and share similar characteristics, but the powertrain is much different. Starting with the Kia Optima Hybrid, a 2.0-liter I4 Full Parallel Hybrid System runs things with a 2.0-liter GDI engine with CVVT and a 38 kW motor powered by a 1.76 kWh lithium polymer battery. It may not seem like much, but the engine designs GDI and CVVT completely change the game.

“GDI” stands for gasoline direct injection, a type of fuel injection system that injects highly pressurized fuel directly into the cylinders of an engine during the combustion cycle. Due to its resulting optimization of horsepower and fuel economy, it’s starting to replace other injection systems. “CVVT”, or Continuously Variable Valve Timing, like “CVT” transmission, can alter the timing of air intake and exhaust valve lift events to suit all speeds and conditions, without losing fuel or power. Together, this leads to a total output of 193-horsepower for the Kia Optima Hybrid, with a fuel economy of 39/46 mpg city/highway.

Unlike the Kia Optima Hybrid, that relies on regenerative braking to charge the battery (a process of transferring the power used to top a vehicle (braking) into a generator for the electric motor), the Kia Optima PHEV is a plug-in hybrid-electric vehicle. This means drivers can rely on regenerative braking or just charge the battery via an electrical outlet/charging station. With that comes the ability to drive on electricity-alone with zero emissions.

The Kia Optima PHEV is powered by a 156-hp 2.0-liter GDI engine and a 50 kW electric motor, powered by a 9.8 kWh lithium-ion polymer battery pack. The combined fuel economy currently sits at 40 mpg, and that’s when it is in hybrid mode. If running on electricity-alone, drivers can cover over 30 miles before needing power from the engine. It has three ways to charge the battery: regenerative braking, a Level 1 (120v) charger that receives a full charge in 9 hours, and a Level 2 (240v) charger for use at public station to charge up in less than 3 hours.

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