Tag Archives: kia phev

Miami Lakes Electric Vehicle Recharging

The ABCs of Electric Vehicle Recharging

Miami Lakes Electric Vehicle Recharging

Jeez the auto market is being taken over by hybrids isn’t it? To think the first hybrids started to make headway into the industry about a decade ago, and to see how many are on the road today is pretty impressive. Today, auto names like Kia Motors are quickly adding hybrids, plug-in electric hybrids (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs) to their lineup, and one day, you may find yourself in one and in need of a charge.

Different Types of Charging

Due to innovative systems that recycle various types of energy, like regenerative braking, PHEVs and EVs both recharge their vehicle’s battery (or batteries) while on the road. However, this happens little-by-litte, whereas recharging can get a battery to 80% full in a couple of hours. While PHEVs can be powered by gas, electricity, or both, EVs are only powered by electricity. Thus, EV drivers can only refuel at a charging station, and that makes it’s important for a driver to know all about charging their vehicle, what’s the fastest method of recharging, what’s the most cost effective method of recharging, and what is the most practical?

Home Charging

The most practical and convenient way to recharge a PHEV or EV is by plugging into the wall or installing a 240-volt home charger. The latter is becoming pretty popular, and we discuss more on that below. Sure, there may be a little bump in the monthly electric bill, but it isn’t all that bad. According to FuelEconomy.gov and the current national average of electricity, the average cost of electricity for the Kia Soul EV to travel 25 miles is about $1.04 The national average for electricity, or about $4.16 to travel 100 miles? That’s not much.

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Miami Lakes Kia Niro Plug-in Hybrid PHEV

2017 Kia Niro PHEV Debut

Miami Lakes Kia Niro Plug-in Hybrid PHEVKia has been kicking some auto industry butt hasn’t it? When they unleashed the Kia Stinger, we were all pretty impressed. Then came the Niro, a hybrid crossover, and we were happy to see another green vehicle. Now they’ve unveiled a Kia Niro PHEV, and we couldn’t be more stoked about its debut.

When turning a hybrid vehicle into a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), two of the biggest changes is how you charge the battery and the size of the battery itself. In terms of the Kia Niro PHEV, the vehicle gets a bigger 8.9 kWh battery. The battery will be paired with its standard 1.6-liter gasoline direct injection engine, and due to a larger battery, its electric-only driving range is currently said to lie somewhere between 25-34 miles on a single charge in tandem with regenerative braking.

PHEVs tend to have two or three charging ports, with the third usually set up to charge a majority of the battery in half an hour. There is no word on the set up the Kia Niro PHEV will have yet, but rest assured it will have the usual Level 1 (120v) charging port for overnight charging and a Level 2 (240v) charging port for quicker (about 3 hours is the standard) charging at public stations. Although not a lot of news on the PHEV yet, there is one surprise Kia gave us that might interest crossover drivers that use it to carry equipment.

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Miami Lakes 2017 Kia Optima Phev Kia Niro

Will a Future Kia Niro PHEV Take its Cues From the New Optima PHEV?

Miami Lakes 2017 Kia Optima Phev Kia Niro

Crossovers and types of alternative fuel are the future of the automarket. CUVs not only offer safety and capability, but today they also offer convenience, entertainment, and fuel efficiency. With vehicles like the new 2018 Kia Niro, a hybrid that may also be available as a PHEV in the future, it seems that automakers are combining CUVs and alternative fuel technologies to create the perfect vehicle.

Kia has several hybrid and electric vehicles in the lineup – Kia Optima Hybrid, Kia Optima Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV), Kia Soul EV, and the all-new Kia Niro. The specs aren’t definite for the Niro PHEV, however it was debuted at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show, and many were given a glimpse of what it could be capable of. Let’s take a look at the Kia Optima PHEV and see if Kia really made a crossover PHEV that can match a sedan PHEV.

Kia Optima PHEV

The third variation of the Kia Optima, the Optima PHEV is powered by a 2.0-liter GDI engine and an electric motor that is powered by a 9.8 kWh lithium polymer battery. This is known as a full parallel hybrid system, and its combined battery and engine power produce 202 horsepower with an amazing fuel economy – 38 miles in the city, 43 miles on the highway. That’s just the beginning of its capabilities though.’

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Miami Lakes Kia Hybrid Electric Niro Crossover

Kia’s Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

Miami Lakes Kia Hybrid Electric Niro Crossover

Kia has been coming out with a lot of new vehicles lately. This year we were treated to the debut of the Kia Stinger, and at SEMA, we got a glimpse of some autonomous vehicles Kia is developing. However, until autonomous vehicles become the norm, automakers need to focus on where the money is, and right now that’s crossovers, SUVs, and hybrids. No wonder Kia has four of their own, including the 2017 Kia Niro Hybrid Crossover.

SO, where did it all start? We’re thinking the Kia Optima Hybrid set the stage, a variation of the original Optima, followed by the Optima PHEV and Kia Soul EV – another variation of an original model. The 2017 Kia Niro is the most recent of the trend.

Kia Optima Hybrids

The 2017 Kia Optima Hybrid and PHEV are both variations of the original Kia Optima. They may look the same and share similar characteristics, but the powertrain is much different. Starting with the Kia Optima Hybrid, a 2.0-liter I4 Full Parallel Hybrid System runs things with a 2.0-liter GDI engine with CVVT and a 38 kW motor powered by a 1.76 kWh lithium polymer battery. It may not seem like much, but the engine designs GDI and CVVT completely change the game.

“GDI” stands for gasoline direct injection, a type of fuel injection system that injects highly pressurized fuel directly into the cylinders of an engine during the combustion cycle. Due to its resulting optimization of horsepower and fuel economy, it’s starting to replace other injection systems. “CVVT”, or Continuously Variable Valve Timing, like “CVT” transmission, can alter the timing of air intake and exhaust valve lift events to suit all speeds and conditions, without losing fuel or power. Together, this leads to a total output of 193-horsepower for the Kia Optima Hybrid, with a fuel economy of 39/46 mpg city/highway.

Unlike the Kia Optima Hybrid, that relies on regenerative braking to charge the battery (a process of transferring the power used to top a vehicle (braking) into a generator for the electric motor), the Kia Optima PHEV is a plug-in hybrid-electric vehicle. This means drivers can rely on regenerative braking or just charge the battery via an electrical outlet/charging station. With that comes the ability to drive on electricity-alone with zero emissions.

The Kia Optima PHEV is powered by a 156-hp 2.0-liter GDI engine and a 50 kW electric motor, powered by a 9.8 kWh lithium-ion polymer battery pack. The combined fuel economy currently sits at 40 mpg, and that’s when it is in hybrid mode. If running on electricity-alone, drivers can cover over 30 miles before needing power from the engine. It has three ways to charge the battery: regenerative braking, a Level 1 (120v) charger that receives a full charge in 9 hours, and a Level 2 (240v) charger for use at public station to charge up in less than 3 hours.

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