Posts Tagged ‘federal tax credit’

New Info on the 2020 Kia Niro EV

Thursday, March 19th, 2020
miami-lakes-2020-kia-niro-ev

miami-lakes-2020-kia-niro-ev

The Kia Niro EV took awhile to come to the North American market, but since the Niro EV came to the US, it’s continued to win awards. Popular Mechanics was quick to name the 2019 Kia Niro EV the Car of the Year, and during its initial overseas release, consumer magazine and website What Car? awarded the Kia Niro EV with the “Car of the Year Award”, making the Niro EV the first Korean car to win the prestigious award. Here we are in 2020, things are crazy, but the Kia Niro EV is still the green car to buy, even with its 2020 price hike.

Why the price hike? It’s unclear. Perhaps Kia Motors is worried COVID-19 will affect production and costs and wants to tip the scales a bit. Perhaps demand for alternative fuel vehicles and hybrids have grown over the years in the U.S. Hybrid vehicles and EVs are certainly more popular overseas, but regardless, the 2020 Kia Niro EV sees a price increase of $590 from the 2019 starting MSRP of $38,500 (plus destination fee). Although not yet available, this brings the starting MSRP for the 2020 Kia Niro EV to $39,090.

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The Benefits of Driving an Electric Vehicle

Thursday, September 20th, 2018
Miami Lakes Automall Benefits Driving Electric

Miami Lakes Automall Benefits Driving Electric

With the impressive range of the Kia Niro EV, 280 miles, and other electric vehicles by Kia Motors, like the 2018 Kia Soul EV, we thought we’d brush up on electric vehicles 101 and drop some knowledge. We’ve covered electric vehicle charging and the misconceptions about plug-in hybrid vehicles before. But with many people in North America still unsure how hybrid and electric technology works, it might be a good time to inform the masses about all the benefits an electric vehicle can bring. Here are five things to know about electric cars.

The Drive

Driving an electric car will feel a lot more differently than a vehicle powered by the standard internal combustion engine. Not only is an electric vehicle (EV) more silent, although some automakers install a program to mimic an engine noise for consumers who prefer to hear the motor running, but the pull of a gas-powered vehicle when the engine gets going is nearly non-existent. Electric vehicles don’t need to “power up” to get going – all the power they need is already available.

How to drive EVs are also changing the game. With the way technology is moving, one-pedal powertrains are becoming commonplace. A one-pedal powertrain means the cockpit only comes with one pedal and an emergency brake pedal. To accelerate or to decelerate, the driver puts pressure on or alleviates pressure from the accelerator like usual, but when decelerating with a one-pedal powertrain, the car will be brought to a stop naturally. The emergency brake pedal is available for instances where the driver needs to stop immediately. Plus, many alternative fuel vehicles come with regenerative braking to recharge the battery when bringing the vehicle to a stop.

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Going Green with Help from Kia Motors

Friday, July 7th, 2017
Miami Lakes Going Green Kia Motors

Miami Lakes Going Green Kia Motors

When going green for your next car, take a look at Kia Motors. They have many hybrid and electric vehicles, and more are on the way. No other automotive company has expanded their lineup with green cars as much as Kia Motors, unless they’re purely a hybrid and/or EV automaker. Kia has the Kia Optima in three different variations, the Kia Soul as an electric vehicle, the recent Kia Niro hybrid crossover, and the Kia Stonic is due by the year’s end. There are many choices, but how do you know which one to pick?

The Kia Optima – Gas, EV, and PHEV

Let’s look at the Kia Optima, the first of the bunch. The Kia Optima lineup has three gasoline-powered engine options of varying power. The smallest engine option is a 1.6-liter DOHC I4 engine with a turbocharger that generates 178-horsepower and 195 lb-ft of torque. Turbocharged, it has a little more bang, and with the implementation of a double overhead camshaft (DOHC), there is less stress on the engine, leading to a commendable fuel economy of 28 mpg in the city and 37 mpg on the highway. The strongest engine option is a turbocharged 2.0-liter DOHC I4, generating 245 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque. This engine helps the Optima achieve a fuel economy of 22/32 mpg city/highway.

Gasoline cars are pretty easy to take care of. There’s a gas station every mile or so on the road as long as you’re not on the interstate, so filling up is easy. However, as with all cars, a gasoline car has long-term expenses. Most consumers will be looking at a cost between $1,000 and $2,000 a year for fuel.

The Kia Optima Hybrid is surprisingly strong. The Optima Hybrid has a 2.0-liter engine with gasoline direct injection and continuously variable valve timing technology. Made with an I4 Full Parallel Hybrid System, the hybrid has been optimized as much as possible for the best performance. It can generate up to 193 horsepower, and gets 39 mpg in the city and 46 mpg on the highway. That’s a 10 percent increase from a year ago, and Kia will continue to increase the fuel efficiency of its vehicles going forward.

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Pros and Cons of Gas, Hybrids, PHEVs, and EVs

Monday, May 15th, 2017
Miami Lakes Kia Alternative Fuel

Miami Lakes Kia Alternative Fuel

The fuels we use to power automobiles today are starting to vary greatly. For the better part of the last century, all we had was gasoline and diesel. Although alternatively powered vehicles were being invented as early as 1828, the first mass-produced hybrid vehicle didn’t come about until 1997. Today, the auto industry has pushed past that, and we’re seeing more plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) than ever before. Some companies are even researching and developing hydrogen fuel cells as a new source, but the practicality and popularity of that is a little ways down the road. Today, it all comes down to cars powered by gasoline, a hybrid, a PHEV, or an EV for getting where you need to go. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, though, and they’re worth taking into consideration the next time you’re in the market for an automobile.

Gasoline Vehicles

It was the first fuel source for vehicles we had, but it won’t be the last. We all know how they work. We fill up, we drive, we fill up again. So let’s get right down to it.

A lot of the advantages of gasoline powered vehicles are pretty out-dated with the new fuel sources we have now. They used to travel further than most vehicles, unless we’re talking about diesel-power, and the smaller the car the further it will go before it needs to be filled up. However, because gasoline vehicles are practical and conventional, when running on fumes, there’s bound to be a gas station around the corner unless we’re on the interstate, and even then, a place to fill up could be right off the next exit. Plus, when it comes to hauling a payload or towing, gasoline and diesel engines are really the best choice to make ‘cause they’ll definitely get the job done.

We know the disadvantages like the back of our hand. Gasoline vehicles are killing the environment – the Kia Sportage uses 14.3 barrels of petroleum every year! It also emits 397 grams per mile of greenhouse gas emissions. Gasoline prices are never the same, and the more oil we use, the higher the prices will be. Those of you driving around the Bush era know what we’re talking about – $4/gallon, what is this?! And there’s definitely no special perks like the federal tax credits you’ll find below. The main perk is they’re becoming cheaper to build with aluminum and other lighter resources going into auto body construction, so most gasoline-powered vehicles will save you more upfront than an alternative fuel-powered vehicle.

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